Current Data: What We've Learned

  • The Alliance for Eating Disorders Awareness reports:

    • Eating disorders can affect people of all ages, genders, socioeconomic statuses, shapes and sizes, sexual orientations, races and ethnicities can suffer from an eating disorder.

    • Over 30 million Americans experience a clinically significant eating disorder during their lifetime.

    • Eating disorders have the highest mortality rate of any mental illness, with nearly 1 person dying every hour as a direct result of their eating disorder.

    • 13% of women over the age of 50 have symptoms of an eating disorder.

    • Only about one third of people ever receive treatment for their eating disorder.

    • Full recovery from an eating disorder is possible. Early detection and intervention are important.

    • Help is available and recovery is possible.

  • National Association of Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders (ANAD) reports​:

    • General Statistics

      • At least 30 million people of all ages and genders suffer from an eating disorder in the U.S.

      • Every 62 minutes at least one person dies as a direct result from an eating disorder.

      • Eating disorders have the highest mortality rate of any mental illness.

      • 13% of women over 50 engage in eating disorder behaviors.

      • In a large national study of college students, 3.5% sexual minority women and 2.1% of sexual minority men reported having an eating disorder.

      • 16% of transgender college students reported having an eating disorder.

      • In a study following active duty military personnel over time, 5.5% of women and 4% of men had an eating disorder at the beginning of the study, and within just a few years of continued service, 3.3% more women and 2.6% more men developed an eating disorder.

      • Eating disorders affect all races and ethnic groups.

      • Genetics, environmental factors, and personality traits all combine to create risk for an eating disorder.

    • Anorexia Nervosa

      • 0.9% of American women suffer from anorexia in their lifetime.

      • 1 in 5 anorexia deaths is by suicide.

      • 50-80% of the risk for anorexia and bulimia is genetic.

      • 33-50% of anorexia patients have a comorbid mood disorder, such as depression. Mood disorders are more common in the binge/purge subtype than in the restrictive subtype.

      • About half of anorexia patients have comorbid anxiety disorders, including obsessive-compulsive disorder and social phobia.

    • Bulimia Nervosa

      • 1.5% of American women suffer from bulimia nervosa in their lifetime.

      • Nearly half of bulimia patients have a comorbid mood disorder.

      • More than half of bulimia patients have comorbid anxiety disorders.

      • Nearly 1 in 10 bulimia patients have a comorbid substance abuse disorder, usually alcohol use

    • Binge Eating Disorder

      • 2.8% of American adults suffer from binge eating disorder in their lifetime.

      • Nearly half of BED patients have a comorbid mood disorder.

      • More than half of BED patients have comorbid anxiety disorders.

      • Nearly 1 in 10 BED patients have a comorbid substance abuse disorder, usually alcohol use. 

      • Binge eating or loss-of-control eating may be as high as 25% in post-bariatric patients

    • Diabulimia

      • Diabulimia is deliberate insulin underuse in people with type 1 diabetes for the purpose of controlling weight.

      • About 38% of females and 16% of males with type 1 diabetes have disordered eating behaviors.

      • Insulin omission increases risks for retinopathy, neuropathy, and diabetic ketoacidosis.

      • In a longitudinal study, diabulimia increased mortality risk threefold

 

Click here for ANAD sources/references

 

The most common eating disorder in the United States is binge eating disorder (BED). It is estimated that 3.5% of women, 2% of men, and 30% to 40% of those seeking weight loss treatments can be clinically diagnosed with binge eating disorder. (National Eating Disorder Association, NEDA)

                                               Seeking help, want to learn more? See 

                                         Mirror Mirror Eating Disorder Help

                      (www.mirror-mirror.org)

 

For more information, see:

Herrin, M. (2011, July 30). What does the research say about ethnicity and eating disorders? Psychology Today. Retrieved from https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/eating-disorders-news/201107/what-does-the-research-say-about-ethnicity-and-eating-disorders   

 

Maine, M. D. (2012). Body image despair: What’s age got to do with it? National Eating Disorders Association, NationalEatingDisorder.org. Retrieved from

https://www.nationaleatingdisorders.org/sites/default/.../WhatsAgeGottodoWithIt.pdf

 

National Association of Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders (ANAD). (2018). Eating Disorder Statistics. Retrieved from https://anad.org/education-and-awareness/about-eating-disorders/eating-disorders-statistics

 

People of color and eating disorders. (2018). Retrieved from National Eating Disorders Association (NEDA), https://www.nationaleatingdisorders.org/people-color-and-eating-disorders

Pietrangelo, A. (2018 January). Eating disorders plaguing older women. Healthline.com. Retrieved from https://www.healthline.com/health-news/eating-disorders-plaguing-older-women#1

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© 2018 Oya~Pathfinding for Human & Organizational Development, LLC

This website is NOT intended to replace or be a substitute for counselling. It may play a role in helping you prepare for counselling , reaching out for help, or answer some questions you may have about various issues, concerns, or behaviors.